Castello Sforzesco, Milan

The grand central tower

The grand central tower

Milan’s most important Renaissance building was originally a 14th-century fortress, complete with massive fortifications, a moat, barracks, a prison and a courtyard, before being converted to a residence by then-duke Franceso Sforza. Upcoming artist Leonardo da Vinci frescoed many of the rooms.

One of two cylindrical towers

One of two cylindrical towers

The tower and much of the building is rebuilt and the courtyard, Cortile della Rocchetta, remains.

Inside the courtyard

Inside the courtyard

The castle’s park, Parco Sempione, spreads over 47 hectares. Since it was raining when I visited, I didn’t bother wandering around.

One of Michelangelo’s last sculptures, the unfinished Pietà Rondanini

One of Michelangelo’s last sculptures, the unfinished Piet`a Rondanini

Today, eight museums are housed in the Castello Sforzesco, including fine arts, archeological, musical instruments, ancient art, sculpture and applied arts.

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