Archive | Geneva RSS feed for this section

Carouge

Carouge is a pleasant detour from downtown Geneva. The suburb (a short tram-ride away from the Old Town) was built in the 18th century by Victor Amideus, King of Sardinia, to be a refuge for artists and designers and anyone else who wanted refuge from Geneva’s strict puritanical ways. Turinese architects designed low houses with […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Mont Salève

1,380-meter Mont Salève is part of the Jura chain and the first ridge of the Alps rising southeast of Geneva. Though in France, its proximity to Geneva makes it an ideal destination for Swiss hikers, skiers, mountain bikers, rock climbers and paragliders. The steep bald side faces Geneva and the gently sloping southern side overlooks […]

Read full story Comments { 2 }

Villa Diodati, Cologny

Villa Diodati, a lakeside villa in Cologny, a municipality of Geneva, is best known for housing Lord Byron back in the summer of 1816. His pals Mary and Percy Shelley stayed in a nearby house, Maison Chapuis. Here, Mary Shelley concocted the idea for Frankenstein, the origins of which came to her in a nightmare. […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Promenade de la Treille

If you’re thinking this is the longest wooden bench you’ve ever seen, you’re right. With 126 meters of seating, it’s the longest bench in the world. The promenade offers a ho-hum view over the city, but it’s nice to sit on the bench and take in the chestnut tree-lined square. Tweet

Read full story Comments { 2 }

Temple de la Madeleine, Geneva

This Gothic church with a Romanesque bell tower was built in the 15th century, on a site that housed predecessors dating back to the fifth century. Most of what we see today is the result of a 17th century restoration after a massive fire destroyed the neighborhood, and 20th century restoration that added stained-glass windows. […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Genève

The Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Genève is a mishmash of structures and styles. Part of what we see today was built in the 12th century on remains dating from 350 A.D. Walls, rooms and mosaic floors from the earlier time have been discovered beneath the cathedral. In the late-14th century, a small side-chapel, the Chapelle des […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Auditoire de Calvin, Geneva

It’s fitting that Calvin’s namesake chapel is so austere. This single-nave chapel played an important role in the Protestant Reformation. From 1536, the auditorium was a lecture hall where Calvin espoused his theories (Geneva accepted the Reformation in 1535). When Protestant refugees flocked to Geneva from all over Europe, they were encouraged to conduct services […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Maison Tavel, Geneva

Maison Tavel is Geneva’s oldest house. It was built by the Tavel family in the 12th century and was renovated after a fire in the 14th century. Today the house is a museum that details Geneva’s history. In addition to historical items such as doors and signs and other daily life memorabilia, there is a […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Favorite Swiss Dishes

Dining in Switzerland is a real treat. Not only is the food hearty and delicious, but traditional Swiss restaurants with ancient wood beams and Swiss kitsch galore allow you to soak up the quintessentially Swiss Alpine vibe. Swiss cuisine centers around dairy. It’s hard to find a meal without cheese, milk, butter and/or cream. Of […]

Read full story Comments { 3 }

Geneva

Everywhere you look in Switzerland, you will find stunning natural beauty. The imposing Alps stretch toward the sky, the lush greenery is more shades than you ever realized existed and the lake is deep and pure. Geneva sits at the point where the Rhône flows out of Lake Geneva, with the Jura ridges on one […]

Read full story Comments { 2 }